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Gardening

Community for : 3.4 years

For stuff you grow in dirt.

Owner: veo

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18
I've never had any luck growing radishes, apparently one of the easiest of plants to grow, but...paydirt!     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 2 weeks ago (+19/-1)
14 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/nc08dgk/IMG-8146.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/8xJg8rB/IMG-8145.jpg

And I can't figure out what I did right. I was trying to grow mostly the bulbous variety rather than the long radishes but they got leggy which suggests not enough light whereas the long radishes were in the sunniest spot in the garden (for mid winter). And an added bonus is I grew the long radishes in shallow seed trays which was an experiment as we have lots laying around and not put to any good use. It's wonderful to be rewarded by your garden.I was about to give up on radishes but then today spotted some beauties. Very exciting!

5
Did you know that you can use defensive plants for home security?     (www.msn.com)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 3 weeks ago (+5/-0)
4 comments last comment...
13
some berry fruit     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 2 months ago (+15/-2)
18 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/MpR9n4h/IMG-9266.jpg

Never been able to crack the berry growing so don't bother any more.
19
a tomato     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 2 months ago (+19/-0)
14 comments last comment...
35
Lawn replaced with a carpet of wildflowers to help bees - and because mowing was tedious (nice pics)     (www.vermontpublic.org)
submitted by NeedleStack to Gardening 2 months ago (+35/-0)
20 comments last comment...
-1
St. Clare Heirloom Seeds     (www.stclareseeds.com)
submitted by iSnark to Gardening 2 months ago (+0/-1)
0 comments...
23
Lettuce-in-a-pot     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 2 months ago (+23/-0)
22 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/vDgYkXm/lettuce-in-a-pot.jpg

For those of you who follow me, which, um, is no-one, you'll know I ditched the traditional veggie patch for growing stuff in pots and it's paying dividends.

The advantages of a pot or tub garden for me are:

.easier to keep tree roots at bay.
.snails/slugs need to climb which might make the plants less vulnerable? Doubt it.Snails etc are great climbers.
.more efficient watering.
.easier to change the garden about if need be i.e. just move a pot.

These lettuces are so fresh, pure and perfect.
56
I know it's silly, but this is the first time I've ever gotten an orchid to bloom. original content     (files.catbox.moe)
submitted by PeckerwoodPerry to Gardening 3 months ago (+56/-0)
33 comments last comment...
https://files.catbox.moe/sadhyg.jpg

I've had dozens of orchids over the years, and they never rebloom. I've had this one for at least two years and today I was greeted with this. Pretty fuckin stoked.
13
Garden visitor left a calling card.     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 3 months ago (+13/-0)
10 comments last comment...
11
Malabar Spinach for serious preppers (a lot of vegetable matter/packed with nutrients).     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 3 months ago (+11/-0)
10 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/JtQj2Bt/IMG-8104.jpg

aka Ceylon spinach, climbing spinach, gui, acelga trapadora, bratana, libato, vine spinach and Malabar nightshade.

It's not a real spinach and it has an earthy taste but it's full of goodness and such an efficient plant in that just one would probably equal a couple of rows of traditional spinach!

A good filler food in soup especially.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/malabar-spinach/growing-malabar-spinach.htm

"The vine should be trellised and two plants are sufficient for most families through the summer and fall growing season.".
3
I grew some chokos (aka Chayote, Sicyos edule, christophine, mirliton)     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 3 months ago (+5/-2)
8 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/mHbB9Qn/IMG-8083.jpg

On the taste level - at the bottom of the scale - but a lovely looking fruit and it has dense vegetable matter like a potato so probably lots of nutrients. When harvested small they are tender and taste like mild peas. The ones in the pic are too big because I didn't discover them until late. Seems to be an easy-to-grow plant and if your garden doesn't produce much it's a plant for you as it produces a lot of fruit.

"Chokos in Australia were known as a 'filler' for low-income families during the Great Depression. Given the choko's ability to grow wild and yield plenty of crops, it was seen as a free backyard source of fibre and nutrition."
3
Date Sprouts     (img.gvid.tv)
submitted by Sector2 to Gardening 3 months ago (+4/-1)
15 comments last comment...
https://img.gvid.tv/i/2Hbp55o4.jpg

These are a few months old, and around 12 or 15 different types of dates. I have no room for palm trees, so am thinking of gorilla gardening around a nearby lagoon.

Still have another 2.5 pounds of seeds (more than a packed quart ziplock) if I can find a place for these. Salad, maybe?
23
Spring planting     (Gardening)
submitted by bosunmoon to Gardening 4 months ago (+23/-0)
27 comments last comment...
Just planted 4 peach trees, 6 highbush blueberries and 6 raspberries.
Feels good.
31
The Wasabi is flowering. original content     (files.catbox.moe)
submitted by Sector2 to Gardening 4 months ago (+31/-0)
8 comments last comment...
https://files.catbox.moe/e1tubw.jpg

Bought 3 sets of live Wasabi plants a couple years ago from a grower a bit south of San Francisco. First time they've flowered. Still in the one gallon pots, so probably time to separate the multiple rhizomes, harvest a few, and repot the rest.

So far the only pure Wasabi I've had is the freeze dried, so am anticipating my first fresh. You never get actual Wasabi at your sushi place. It's mainly horseradish and chemical dyes.

If you garden, the starts are very affordable, and they multiply off of the main rhizome. The initial 3 sets could become 24 separate pots now.

https://hmbwasabi.com/shop/ (plants and parts)

After winter and before summer heat is probably the best time for shipping.
8
Excess-Produce Stress - swimming in cucumbers!     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 4 months ago (+8/-0)
5 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/7gtsWvD/IMG-8073.jpg

Just about harvested the lot, thank god, with only a few small ones not being eaten. Probably got 10-15. Now I know I can grow them I'll plant fewer next season. We could have given some to our neighbours but we don't like them.

The monster in the pic was missed due to my messy garden. I expected it to be bitter but it verged on sweet! I skinned the cucumber; shaved most of it with a peeler and tipped the shavings on top of some slices of bread on a plate, added pepper, olive oil and parmesan cheese and ate with a knife and fork. Not bad. Would have been nicer with buttered bread but I was lazy.
1
Gardening expert reveals 'cat repelling' plant that will make felines 'run for a mile' away from your garden     (www.dailymail.co.uk)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 5 months ago (+4/-3)
8 comments last comment...
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/gardening/article-13083473/Gardening-expert-tip-cat-repelling-plant.html

What I've been using on a patch of loose soil the neighbour's cat found attractive is laundry detergent.So far so good.
13
a little gourd growing quietly away.     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 5 months ago (+13/-0)
12 comments last comment...
20
I can grow mangoes.     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 6 months ago (+21/-1)
18 comments last comment...
5
I'm not a good gardener but I've finally cracked cucumber-growing     (Gardening)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 6 months ago (+7/-2)
25 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/HChR47X/IMG-7904.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/pym0bwk/IMG-7905.jpg

And it's due to the growing-medium and a sunny spot. In the past I didn't pay enough attention to the growing-medium and used soil/compost which, when baked in the sun, became as hard as rock and didn't drain well either.

I cut a lot of grass but can't put it on the garden generally as mulch (hay) because of the fire-risk. So I mix the decomposed grass with decomposed leaf litter, put it in my tubs and the plants love it. No soil because there is none unless I buy it. My mix probably contains too much nitrogen which promotes excessive leaf/stem growth but so far I've had a modest potato harvest and the cucumber crop is looking to be a great success. I've planted capsicums in the mixture and they are yet to strut their stuff but...fingers crossed. So I'm rather chuffed that my "soil" works!
4
My veggie patch is a mess (please don't agree too enthusiastically). Next year ...netting!     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 7 months ago (+6/-2)
9 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/Wcv4P06/veggie-patch.jpg

The problem is this critter - the bower bird:

https://birdlife.org.au/bird-profiles/satin-bowerbird/

The female is a lovely bird and has a lovely whooping sound at dawn (male has the same sound, I think, but isn't as attractive). But the bower bird is partly a ground bird and very adept at getting into small places where it snips the leaves of new plants. So the plants hardly get a chance to grow let alone have fruit. I think the bower bird is probably second only to the brush turkey as an Aus gardener's nightmare.
9
Predator     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 7 months ago (+12/-3)
12 comments last comment...
4
a plant in my garden     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 8 months ago (+8/-4)
1 comments last comment...
-2
Hi @AryanPrime. Harvested a few tubs of potatoes. Very disappointing. Small.     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 8 months ago (+1/-3)
11 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/Q6p9Ntf/potatoes-2023.jpg

Might have to ditch spud growing in favour of beans where I seem to have more success. I refuse to use souped-up soil. The problem seems to be too much nitrogen due to grass mulch. Lots of lovely leaf growth but few tubers! And f..k you too!
4
I've received a lot of PMs from folk wanting to know about my battle with the Compost Heap. I've established a breakout!     (Gardening)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 9 months ago (+5/-1)
12 comments last comment...
It's been a tough couple of days. At times I despaired but then I remembered I ... was a Goat: "Horns of steel; eyes of fire" and I persevered. Got a long way to go. Not the easiest way to manage a compost heap but space is the problem.

I need to reduce the size of the thing relatively quickly because the fire season is here and it's a fire risk. Also if you can't turn it...it isn't working (breaking down). I'm sifting out the fine material and bagging it. If I let it break down fully into soil...the tree roots go for it.

https://i.ibb.co/5vh4jhR/Compost-heap-breakthrough.jpg
https://i.ibb.co/MMZdpQh/bagged-leaf-litter.jpg
https://i.ibb.co/NKy2LK3/hibiscus.jpg


@Crackinjokes "What a pile of s***!".
6
Every now and again a man likes to share something pleasurable with the bros - something he enjoys - my compost heap.     (i.ibb.co)
submitted by paul_neri to Gardening 9 months ago (+9/-3)
13 comments last comment...
https://i.ibb.co/qFw7LMh/compost-heap.jpg

It's too big and I can't turn it so I need to "bandicoot" the partly broken-down leaf litter and bag it i.e. mine the heap like a gold miner. It got too big because the fire season hit very early and so there's been a mad effort to rake up leaves etc.